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vinay
Posted on: Aug 16 2017, 08:14 PM


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Wow, it's been a very long while since I've been here and couldn't even find a link on the Magura main page anymore. Came here by coincidence (did a search engine search) but considering the amount of spam I suspect this forum is not actively being monitored anymore.

Back to your original question, I can imagine you're not pleased. I'm not up to date with the latest Magura stuff but I do know the recent generation of Magura dual piston MT brakes have different amounts of brake force (unlike the first generation 2-4-6-8 brakes which all performed similar). What I expect is that the current MT4 master has the same piston diameter as your older MT8 brake so you'll still get the same behaviour as what you're used to. I'll check with the staff to get confirmation on whether I'm correct here or not. And I'll also check whether you could actually be fine with the current MT8 master. I hope to report back as soon as possible!

Cheers!
Vinay
  Forum: MT8 · Post Preview: #21248 · Replies: 1 · Views: 7.247

vinay
Posted on: Sep 30 2015, 02:26 PM


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Glad to hear smile.gif. Yeah, best practice is always to hold your flow and only when you have to brake and where the terrain allows and requires, brake short and hard (without skidding, obviously).
  Forum: Julie · Post Preview: #16170 · Replies: 3 · Views: 13.509

vinay
Posted on: Sep 30 2015, 02:23 PM


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Magura hubs were rebranded DT Swiss hubs. When Magura started with their hydraulic disc brakes, there were too many poorly built disc brake wheels which let the system down. Because of that, Magura built their own wheels so that there was at least a good alternative. Nowadays obviously there is enough choice and these wheels became obsolete. They quit these wheels after model year 2007, well before 1x11 drivetrains became available for mountainbikes.

Your particular hub is a DT Swiss 440 hub, which I doesn't seem to be available anymore from DT Swiss. Magura definitely doesn't stock the hub driver you're after. Your best bet is to check with DT Swiss. I'm afraid they don't hold this upgrade for this older type of hub unless it also fits one of their current hubs.
  Forum: MAGURA Disc Wheels & Hubs · Post Preview: #16169 · Replies: 1 · Views: 43.738

vinay
Posted on: Sep 29 2015, 01:50 PM


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Hi there,

incredible your pads have lasted that long! Make sure you check for wear regularly. Your brakes will still decelerate your bike even with worn pads, but performance will obviously be less and more importantly, there will be more heat transfer to the piston which could damage the seals.

Both 4.1 and 4.2 type pads will fit. 4.1 is performance type, 4.2 is endurance. As the name implies, 4.1 gives you more power and more silent operation, 4.2 will last you longer at the expense of less power and occasionally a bit more noise. I agree it might become hard to get hold of these pads as it has been quite a while and 2007 was in fact the last year these pads were used on Magura brakes. International online vendors are probably your best bet.

If you get hold of new pads, don't forget to bed them in as described in your workshop manual.
  Forum: Julie · Post Preview: #16166 · Replies: 3 · Views: 13.509

vinay
Posted on: Sep 23 2015, 08:05 AM


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Hi Julian,

this might not be necessarily bushing play. Do you also have this when the fork is slightly compressed, so not at the top? What you could possibly check is whether the bolts underneath the fork lowers are loose. Pull out the rebound knob and check the bolts. Don't go beyond 6Nm tightening torque though! The bolt at the rebound unit is hollow aluminum and you wouldn't be the first who snapped it, leaving part in the rebound unit. If you work on your own bike (which most serious mountainbikers do) a torque wrench that works in the lower torque regions (typically below 6Nm for most bicycle parts) would be valuable investment. Otherwise, drop by your bicycle shop to have it checked.

If the bolts are fine and you still have play, there could be something with the bushings. You can't fix that yourself though. Magura does supply bicycle shops with specialized tools for installing and removing bushings, but these are too expensive for any cyclist to obtain. Installing and removing bushings is not something you're supposed to do on a regular basis.

I trust that you have checked but I still have to ask, have you checked the front hub for play and that the qr or axle is tight?

I hope this helps!
  Forum: Durin · Post Preview: #16161 · Replies: 2 · Views: 7.221

vinay
Posted on: Sep 23 2015, 07:40 AM


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Instead of the lever stroke, you probably want to know the volume of oil displaced by master piston. This depends on both the master piston stroke and the master piston diameter. I'm trying to find out, but I don't actually have these brakes.

One major thing you should keep in mind is that these RT brakes are designed as a system, not to be mixed and matched with third party components like the hydraulic actuators for your drum brake. Do the actuators accept Magura Royal Blood, which is a blend of mineral oil? Most other hydraulic brakes use DOT which would destroy a Magura brake.

You'll be facing several hurdles going down this route. As a brake is a safety critical item on your vehicle, we strongly advice against taking chances there. A Frankenstein brake like that is likely to be even less reliable than anything a brake manufacturer would dare to put to a lab test, let alone take for a test ride!
  Forum: RT8 TT · Post Preview: #16160 · Replies: 1 · Views: 7.167

vinay
Posted on: Sep 16 2015, 08:03 AM


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Both are closed systems (as opposed to the current Magura disc brakes) so it will probably work but I'm not sure whether it will work safely, as intended and whether it will even keep up. Your HS33 has 14mm (diameter) master and slave pistons. I'm not sure what these TT brake levers have, I'll have to check. But if these are either larger or smaller you could be in trouble. If the master piston is larger than 14mm your brakes will bite early but brake force will be low. If the master piston is smaller than 14mm your brakes will bite late but hard, making them difficult to control. Either way you won't get the gain in ergonomics you were after.

The HS33 and HS11 master levers are designed with flat or rizer handlebars in mind and I understand that these take up too much space on your type of bars and are looking for an alternative. I'll check with Magura and hope to get back to you for a definite answer, but at the moment it is a NO. As an alternative, you could possibly try to extend your bars a bit to be able to shift the HS33 levers a little. Now that there is a trend towards wider handlebars in mountainbiking, they now also have these kits extend an existing handlebar. They clamp into the bar and give you a few extra cm. This way you can stick to what you have and be confident that it works. You won't be able to guide the hose through the handlebar, but using the banjo fitting for the hose will clean things up a little. This is definitely what I recommend.
  Forum: HS 33 · Post Preview: #16157 · Replies: 2 · Views: 45.064

vinay
Posted on: Sep 8 2015, 07:39 AM


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Oh, I just realized that the Marta brake pads don't have "ears" for pad wear, so these indeed won't rub the rivets. Still I recommend going for a Magura rotor to go with the Magura brake, just to be safe knowing your setup has been properly tested and certified. A floating rotor makes sense if you're concerned about overheating the rotor so that it could warp during heavy use. But your lightweight XC oriented Marta brake will probably find its limits well before a regular (non floating) Magura rotor does.

Aside from my unsolicited remarks about the rotor you're using, I think the hub in question is a rebranded DT Swiss 240 hub. If you're still seriously considering the hub shell, check with DT Swiss if they sell the 240 rear disc hub shell as a spare and that it does actually fit the other parts of your hub. Though as I said, chances are that this is not an economic option and you're better off getting a new hub, lace it to your rim and if you're getting a 240 again your old hub could still be a source for spares. But again, check this with DT. Ten years is a long while and parts from your hub may not be compatible with their current version. If you go past the idea of reusing parts from your old hub, there are loads of good alternatives as well.
  Forum: MAGURA Disc Wheels & Hubs · Post Preview: #16154 · Replies: 3 · Views: 22.148

vinay
Posted on: Sep 8 2015, 12:18 AM


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It seems like you need to have a more progressive spring. You could add a some oil to the air chamber and see if that helps. I have no experience with those lift select forks but I do have a few forks with flight control. The disadvantage of this approach is that oil eventually seeps into the negative air chamber and the spring gets less progressive again. By the looks of the 2016 catalog, there should be volume spacers available. Popping those in would sort matters in a more sustainable way. No way these are ever going to seep into the negative air chamber wink.gif!
  Forum: Thor · Post Preview: #16153 · Replies: 3 · Views: 47.224

vinay
Posted on: Sep 7 2015, 11:52 PM


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If your fork is two years old, lubrication is forkmeister grease. Get it from your Magura dealer. Don't use oil for lubrication as you don't have the slotted bushings for oil and the mix of oil and grease will turn into a sticky mess. As for damping, I'm not sure there as Magura doesn't publish these for their newer forks anymore. They now recommend to have them serviced when the time comes to service the damping unit. But for the small lubrication service, check the video on the Magura website where Bernd shows you how it's done.
  Forum: Other questions about MAGURA · Post Preview: #16152 · Replies: 1 · Views: 45.681

vinay
Posted on: Sep 7 2015, 11:39 PM


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Sorry, that wasn't much of a reply indeed. Until now, that is wink.gif. Check with the dealer locator here for the contact information of the service center in your area. They should be able to help you with this part.

If the lever snapped due to a crash, it may be wise to not mount the master that tight to the handlebar. Instead, leave it just tight enough to be able to control it but to allow it to move out of harms way in the event of a crash. If you've oriented your master properly, you're pulling the lever blade towards the handlebar so there shouldn't be much to make it swivel around. Definitely worth a try, whichever brake you're using.
  Forum: MT4 · Post Preview: #16151 · Replies: 2 · Views: 47.692

vinay
Posted on: Sep 7 2015, 11:28 PM


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Hi there, check the dealer locator here. That should guide you to your Magura dealer and possibly the service center for your area. If that won't work, check with the Magura service center and see if they can send you one. I hope this helps!
  Forum: Wotan · Post Preview: #16150 · Replies: 1 · Views: 47.316

vinay
Posted on: Sep 7 2015, 11:22 PM


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Sorry Jose, I've been away for quite a while indeed wink.gif. Magura hubs are actually rebranded DT hubs. When Magura pioneered the disc brake market for mountainbikes, the product was let down by poorly performing wheels. To deal with this, Magura built and sold wheels to their specification so that people would be safe knowing that the system would work properly when equipped with those wheels. Obviously disc brakes have become the norm for serious mountainbiking and there are enough good wheels around. Hence Magura quit building wheels in 2008 or so. I doubt you can still get the part from Magura. Maybe DT could help you out. Mind you though that the hub shell is the largest part of the hub and chances are that it won't be economical to replace that part compared to just getting a complete new hub. Either way, you're going to have to lace a new wheel as well as you were probably aware of.

On a side note, I would recommend to stick to using a Magura rotor suitable for your Magura Marta brake. I'm not sure what type of floating rotor you're using (is it Hope?) and for what reason exactly, but be aware that as the pads wear, the "ears" could eventually hit the rivets of the floating rotor causing vibration while braking and uneven wear. Judging by the area that seems to be rubbed by the pads, it is very likely that the ears do actually hit the rivet. Keep an eye on it! Your Marta brake does accept newer Magura rotors (Storm, Storm SL and even Ventidisc if you fancy something with a spider).
  Forum: MAGURA Disc Wheels & Hubs · Post Preview: #16149 · Replies: 3 · Views: 22.148

vinay
Posted on: Sep 7 2015, 11:02 PM


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By Julie I assume that you don't have the Julie HP brake (which uses the EBT port) but instead the older Julie brake, 2008 and before. You'll need a Torx T7 tool for the reservoir. It should be included in the service kit which you'll need for bleeding your brakes. It's the green tool. Remember that the tightening torque for these tiny bolts is as little as 1Nm. This is very little, no need to overdo it. You don't want to damage the thread in the composite master body!
  Forum: Julie · Post Preview: #16148 · Replies: 1 · Views: 7.406

vinay
Posted on: Sep 7 2015, 10:53 PM


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Hi Matt, sorry for the late response. If you're still interested, Magura Odur, Menja and Laurin forks were available with either canti-disc (C/D) and firmtech-disc (F/D) lowers. Both types could obviously take a disc brake (IS mount directly, other types with an adaptor). The canti version would accept V-brakes or regular HS11/22/33 rim brakes with the evolution (or EVO2) adaptor. The firmtech version would accept specific firmtech rim brake calipers which don't need adaptors, hence a lower weight and cleaner looks. That's what you have there. So with these lowers, your fork will only accept the Magura firmtech rim brakes or the disc brakes. There is no way to mount V-brakes to your fork.
  Forum: Odur · Post Preview: #16147 · Replies: 1 · Views: 45.722

vinay
Posted on: Dec 23 2010, 11:45 AM


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Hi Alain,

the brakes don't mind the low temperature, but mind you that if you have the reservoir of your Marta brake (or any open system for that matter) located below the rest of the hydraulic system, some air could migrate from the reservoir (where it could accumulate over time) towards the hoses. This may cause your brake to feel soft and you may need to bleed your brake or at least pump the master lever several times to get the bite point back. To prevent this, it is a good idea to squeeze the master lever and hold it down with a rubber band before you store the bike. When the lever is depressed, the master piston blocks the port between the reservoir and the rest of the system. This way, you won't have any issues no matter how you orient the bike. This is also a good idea if you transport the bike in a car or airplane, as described in your workshop manual.

The rim brake has a closed system so you won't have any issues with air in the reservoir, as there is no reservoir smile.gif.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: HS 33 · Post Preview: #10540 · Replies: 1 · Views: 1.950

vinay
Posted on: Dec 22 2010, 04:45 PM


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Hi,

the Louise brake may be fine for trials riding, but it doesn't quite do the brake justice. There are a few things that come to mind which you might have to consider when using a disc brake (any, not particularly Louise) for trials riding.

  1. These brakes have been designed for rolling forwards and then allowing you to decelerate in a contolled manner. With trials, you'll be pushing forwards and back which causes the pads to slide this fraction of a mm back and forth in the caliper. You might experience some accelerated wear over there.
  2. The post mount style calipers which are common nowadays (as opposed to the IS mount which you'd find on older generations of disc brakes) subject their mounts to a compressive load. This is great as it means that except for the preload, the mounting bolts aren't subject large amplitude (fatigue) loads. If you're braking hard on a backwards roll, you'll actually pull on these mounts (hence on the bolts). No real worries here. It will keep up, it is just less ideal.
  3. The larger the trajectory of the torque, the more flex you'll experience. With a disc brake, the tyre applies the force to the rim, to the spokes, to the hub, to the rotor brake surface and finally to the caliper. Compare this to a rim brake where you grip right at the rim. This flex may not be such an issue with a unidirectional load (like with decelerating) but with an alternating load such as you may dish out with trials, you'd rather go for as little play as you possibly can.


So yes, the Louise brake would be fine and there are loads of trials riders out there who use disc brakes for this purpose, but I'd be tempted to say that a hydraulic rim brake is more the way to go when it comes to trials riding.

As for these Ventidisc rotors, I wouldn't be too concerned. These rivets should be fine.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Louise · Post Preview: #10538 · Replies: 2 · Views: 4.731

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 09:02 PM


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Hi Jaybee,

during a regular service, Magura checks wear parts like bushings, seals, dust wipers and the foam rings underneath. They also replace your damping oil. In addition, they of course also do whatever would be done during a small service, that is clean the stanchions and fork lowers and replace the damping fluid and check for damage. If you have additional issues and you mention them when you return the fork for service, they'll look into that as well.

You may run the fork at one of the lower pressure settings. As the rebound unit is supposed to work throughout the entire range of pressure settings (also the higher ones for heavier riders) it also needs the heavier rebound damping settings cope with a higher spring force. I agree that no single rider would ever need the entire rebound range.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Thor · Post Preview: #10533 · Replies: 4 · Views: 3.007

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 01:01 PM


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Hi,

hope you are fine. Magura will only sort this under warranty if you're the first owner of this fork, but of course they might be able to get it back in working order if you send it to your service center. By the looks of it however, your fork is total loss as the main structural components (crown-steerer-stanchion assembly and fork lowers) are both broken. Are you very sure that the previous owner of these forks have taken good care of them? Something like this shouldn't happen too easily!

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Menja · Post Preview: #10531 · Replies: 1 · Views: 2.256

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 12:53 PM


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Hi Dave,

chances are that you've got an air leak at the lower seal of your left hand stanchion. Either where the push rod enters or where the cap closes the stanchion. This doesn't really have anything to do with how well the dust wipers have been installed. You could report this issue when you send your forks off for service, it may just be some small seal at the lower side of the respective stanchion.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Durin · Post Preview: #10529 · Replies: 1 · Views: 1.708

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 12:41 PM


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Hi,

the bolt on the rebound side is a hollow aluminum bolt. It is strong enough when used properly, but if the fork has been ridden with this bolt loose, it may have received some damage. It may seem fine as it is now, but mind you that it will be stuck in the rebound unit when it snaps and it will be pretty hard to get it out. Best would be to have your fork checked or at least replace that bolt. Also, make sure that there is enough lubrication oil in the fork lowers. It may have leaked out while the bolt was loose.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Wotan · Post Preview: #10528 · Replies: 2 · Views: 3.588

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 12:37 PM


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Hi,

your forks may be in need of a service. By the sound of it, too much lubrication oil from the positive air chamber has leaked into the negative air chamber. A service will get this sorted.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Wotan · Post Preview: #10527 · Replies: 3 · Views: 4.862

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 12:35 PM


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Hi,

you can download your manual from the download section (under "service") on the Magura website.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Wotan · Post Preview: #10526 · Replies: 1 · Views: 3.022

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 12:20 PM


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Hi,

thanks for getting back to us and glad it all worked out.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Louise BAT · Post Preview: #10525 · Replies: 36 · Views: 40.816

vinay
Posted on: Dec 20 2010, 12:18 PM


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Hi Mosty,

the procedure Mansikka describes is just as, if not more, reliable as the common bottom-up procedure. The advantage is that you won't have to open the caliper. I do like to add though that you can even get some result without even opening the reservoir cap. This may help you if you've got only a few minutes left before the start signal. Just position the master slightly above horizontal and pump the lever as Mansikka describes. It works best if you squeeze deeply and slowly and quickly release the leverblade. This chases the air back up into the reservoir. You can always top it off afterwards as mentioned, but make sure that you push the pads all the way back into the caliper before you do that. Just to make sure you don't overfill the system.

Cheers,
Vinay
  Forum: Marta · Post Preview: #10524 · Replies: 48 · Views: 40.265

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